What is BMI and how does it affect your Insurance Premium?

BMI is frequently utilised these days, when everyone appears to be talking about fitness. However, the majority of us are unsure what BMI is. Allow us to make things easy for you. The BMI, or Body Mass Index, is a weight-to-height ratio. It is calculated by dividing the weight in kilogrammes by the square of the height in metres. This ratio is used to determine if a person is overweight, obese, or underweight. How do you calculate BMI?
There are three easy methods to calculate BMI-
The BMI calculation formula You can easily calculate the BMI manually using the following formula. The BMI calculation formula = Weight of the person (in kg)/(Height of the person)2 (in m2) A BMI which is less than 18.5 signifies you are underweight.
A BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 is normal for a healthy adult.
A BMI that is between 25 and 29.9 signifies that you are overweight for your height.
A BMI that is beyond 30 indicates that you are Obese.

Body Mass Index charts
A simple way to know where you stand is to refer to the BMI charts for men and women. The BMI charts have weights listed horizontally at the top and heights on the side, vertically. You can easily find the ideal BMI for your height and the ideal weight. Also, you get to know how much at risk you are for weight-related diseases. What effect does your BMI have on your insurance premiums? Your BMI is a measure of how healthy you are. A higher BMI puts you at risk for coronary heart disease as well as other illnesses such as diabetes and other weight-related ailments. Moreover, the expense of medical care as well as the medication required for such disorders is significant. BMI is used by insurance companies to estimate how much your premium should be. The reason behind this is easy to understand. It has a direct impact on your rates if they expect that your medical expenses will be higher. The bigger your outlay, the higher your premium. It's important to remember that these numbers are only a proxy for your overall health. They are not, however, legally obligatory or conclusive. Athletes or those who are exceptionally fit, for example, may have a high BMI. In this situation, the excess weight could be attributable to muscular mass, and they are not considered overweight or obese. As a result, while BMI is good, it is only one of several factors that go into determining how healthy you are.

What is BMI and how does it affect your Insurance Premium?